CTNS Certification Study Guide

Release special: softcover $69

This book is the study guide and textbook for the TCO Certified Telecommunications Network Specialist (CTNS) Certification, conforming to the lessons in the eight CTNS courses and their exams:

  • 2241 Introduction to Broadband Converged IP Telecom
  • 2206 Wireless Telecommunications
  • 2221 Fundamentals of Voice over IP
  • 2201 The PSTN
  • 2212 OSI Layers and Protocol Stacks
  • 2211 LANs, VLANs, Wireless and Optical Ethernet
  • 2213 IP Addresses, Packets and Routers
  • 2214 MPLS and Carrier Networks

The selection of material, its order, timing, and explanations are based on Teracom's famous instructor-led telecommunications training seminar Broadband, Telecom, Datacom and Networking for Non-Engineers: these courses are field-tested to deliver the core knowledge set needed by anyone serious in telecommunications today.

The courses deliver a solid foundation of knowledge in broadband, telecom, datacom and networking: the fundamentals, technologies, jargon and buzzwords, standard practices and most importantly, the underlying ideas, and how it all fits together… with TCO Certification to prove it!

The first four CTNS courses begin with Broadband Converged IP Telecom, an introduction and first pass through all of the topics; followed by Wireless Telecommunications, including 5G and Wi-Fi 6, then Introduction to Voice over IP, and rounded out with The PSTN.

The next courses in CTNS deliver a practical understanding of telecom networks and the three enabling technologies: Ethernet and its MAC frames, IP packets with IP addresses and routers, and the traffic management system MPLS. We begin with the OSI Layers to organize the discussions.

Printed in color, the Study Guide contains all of the text and the main graphic from the online course.  It is intended to enhance your learning and retention while taking the online courses. It is also useful as a day-to-day reference handbook and glossary. Available in a beautiful hardcover edition.

Our goal is to explain the big picture, the jargon and buzzwords, and put in place a very solid base of telecom knowledge spanning fundamentals to the latest technologies and how they are deployed – in plain English.

7" x 10" hardcover, softcover and eBook • 406 pages • published May 2021
ISBN 9781894887625 (softcover)   ISBN 9781894887656 (hardcover)   ISBN 9781894887632 (eBook)

order a professionally printed and bound softcover copy             CTNS study guide amazon ebook  kindle or browser        get CTNS study guide on google play books        get CTNS study guide on itunes / ibooks

★★★★★ Parallels the Teracom CTNS Course. Highly recommended!

By Amazon Customer Chris on March 19, 2017                
Format: Paperback | Verified Purchase
This book parallels the CTNS (Certified Telecommunications Network Specialist) certification offered by https://www.teracomtraining.com/. If you need to know the basics of telecom and IT networking, I highly recommend it!

★★★★★ This is a "must-have" book in every technical library!

By W. Guest. on June 29, 2015
Format: Perfect Paperback  
This is an excellent overview of Telecom, Datacom, and Networking.

Eric Coll is an articulate, thoughtful technical writer with an obvious mastery of this challenging field, and he brings all his skill to bear in this book.

For such a broad technical coverage, the book avoids skipping over critical points, and provides an in-depth look as appropriate to allow you to put everything into proper perspective, and to relate how each technology works with the others.

There are a number of excellent analogies, some neat history, and overall, a simply excellent structure. Easy to read, memorable, and chock-full of information.

I hesitate to call books brilliant, but this is about as close to that as it comes.
Very, very highly recommended!

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Content Overview

The CTNS Study Guide is eight books in one, the textbooks for all CTNS courses combined in one volume, giving you a solid foundation in telecom, datacom and networking, from broadband and cellular, VoIP and the PSTN, to Ethernet, IP and MPLS networking.

Introduction to Broadband Converged IP Telecom
Convergence • Broadband • Network Core and Edge • Protocols • Last Mile Copper, Fiber and Wireless • Residential, Business and Wholesale Services • Network Equipment • Carrier Connections

Wireless Telecommunications
Mobile Network Fundamentals • Cellular Principles • Digitized Voice over Radio • Mobile Internet • FDMA, TDMA, CDMA and OFDM • 4G LTE and OFDMA • 5G: New Spectrum, Ultra-Broadband and IoT • Wi-Fi 6 802.11ax • Communication Satellites

Fundamentals of Voice over IP
Jargon & Buzzwords • VoIP Phone System Components and Operation • Voice Packetization • LANs and WANs • VoIP Phones: MAC Address, DHCP, IP, UDP, RTP, QoS • SIP, Softswitches & SIP Trunking • Cloud • The Future

The PSTN
Loops and Trunks • POTS • Circuit-Switching • LECs, CLECs and IXCs • Analog • Voiceband • DTMF • SS7

The OSI Layers and Protocol Stacks
Protocols & Standards • OSI Model • Layers • TCP/IP • How Protocol Stacks Work

LANs, VLANs, Wireless and Optical Ethernet
MAC Addresses • MAC Frames • Layer 2 Switches • VLANs • Ethernet on Copper • 1000BASE-T • Power over Ethernet • Cable Categories • Office Wiring Plan • Wireless Ethernet (Wi-Fi) • Optical Ethernet • Ethernet in the Core, MANs and PONs • Fiber Types • SFP Transceivers • Field Installation

IP Networks, Routers and Addresses
IP Addresses • Packets • Networks • Routers • Static and Dynamic Addresses • DHCP • Public and Private Addresses • NAT • IPv6

MPLS and Carrier Packet Networks
Carrier Packet Networks • Technologies • MPLS • MPLS VPNs • SLAs • CoS • Integration & Aggregation

Table of Contents / Detailed Outline

  • Course 2241 Introduction to Broadband Converged IP Telecom
    The first course in the CTNS Certification Package is a high-level, wide-ranging introduction to the world of modern IP telecommunications.
    Introduction to Broadband Converged IP Telecom is a first pass through all the different aspects of telecom: explaining the fundamental ideas, jargon, equipment and technologies, the services that are sold, the players, where the money is, and how it all fits together... without bogging down in details on any particular topic.
    In subsequent courses, we'll take another pass and drill deeper into key areas like Wireless, VoIP, PSTN, Ethernet, IP and MPLS. Sometimes we'll go over an essential concept several times, from different perspectives.
    • 1 Course Introduction
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Lesson-by-Lesson Course Overview
      • 1.3 What You Will Learn
      • 1.4 LMS Instructions
    • 2 Convergence
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Definition of "Convergence"
      • 2.3 Two Choices: Channels or Packets
      • 2.4 Third Time is the Charm: IP Packets + MPLS
      • 2.5 Summary
    • 3 Broadband
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Bandwidth and Line Speeds
      • 3.3 Requirements Analysis
      • 3.4 Broadband as a Right in the Countryside
      • 3.5 Summary
    • 4 Today's Converged Telecom Network
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Common Carriers
      • 4.3 Core, Access and Edge; and Interconnect
      • 4.4 Residential, Business and Wholesale Services
      • 4.5 Data Centers
      • 4.6 Summary
    • 5 The Network Core
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Implementation with Optical Ethernet
      • 5.3 Rings and Semi-Meshed Networks
      • 5.4 Summary
    • 6 Network Protocols: Ethernet, IP and MPLS
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Definition of a Network
      • 6.3 Routers Connected with Optical Ethernet Links
      • 6.4 MPLS for Carrier Traffic Management
      • 6.5 Summary
    • 7 Network Access: The Last Mile
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Copper
      • 7.3 Fiber
      • 7.4 Wireless
      • 7.5 Summary
    • 8 Anatomy of a Service
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Three Components of a Service
      • 8.3 Summary
    • 9 Services: Residential, Business and Wholesale
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Residential Services
        • 9.2.1 Services Delivered Over the Internet (not OTT)
        • 9.2.2 VPNs
      • 9.3 Business Services
        • 9.3.1 MPLS VPNs
        • 9.3.2 SD-WAN
        • 9.3.3 Business Voice Services
      • 9.4 Wholesale Services
      • 9.5 Summary
    • 10 Network Equipment
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Ethernet Switches
      • 10.3 Routers
      • 10.4 Frequency-Division Multiplexers
      • 10.5 Optical Switches, Add-Drop Multiplexers and Cross-Connects
      • 10.6 Channelized Time-Division Multiplexers
      • 10.7 Gateways
      • 10.8 Summary
    • 11 Carrier Network Interconnect
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Connections to a PSTN Phone Number
      • 11.3 Internet Connections and Business Service Connections
      • 11.4 Summary
  • Course 2206 Wireless Telecommunications
    Next is a deeper dive into wireless, including radio fundamentals, cellular and mobile telecommunications, 5G, Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) and Starlink.
    We begin with basic concepts and terminology involved in mobile networks, including base stations and transceivers, mobile switches and backhaul, handoffs, cellular radio concepts and digital radio concepts.
    You'll understand how a phone call connects from a cell phone to a landline, and the different methods of allowing other devices to use a smartphone's mobile Internet connection.
    The course is completed with Wi-Fi and communications satellites, in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit and Low Earth Orbit, including Iridium Next and Starlink.
    • 1 Course Introduction
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Technical Introduction and Background
      • 1.3 Learning Objectives
      • 1.4 Course Outline
    • 2 Mobile Network Components, Jargon and Basic Operation
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Mobile Network Components
      • 2.3 Mobility and Handoffs
      • 2.4 Summary
    • 3 Cellular Radio Principles
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Coverage, Capacity and Mobility
      • 3.3 Cellular Radio Frequency Plan
      • 3.4 Capacity: Spectrum Sharing
      • 3.5 Summary
    • 4 PSTN Calls Using the Native Phone App: "Voice Minutes"
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Mobile Telephone Calls
      • 4.2.1 Digitized Voice over Radio
      • 4.2.2 Connection to the PSTN
      • 4.3 Summary
    • 5 Mobile Internet: "Data Plan"
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Mobile Internet
      • 5.3 Smartphone as a Tethered Modem
      • 5.4 Data Roaming
    • 6 Spectrum-Sharing Technologies: FDMA, TDMA, CDMA, OFDM
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 FDMA
      • 6.3 TDMA
      • 6.4 CDMA
      • 6.5 OFDM
      • 6.6 Summary
    • 7 LTE: 4G Mobile Broadband
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 LTE for the UTRAN
      • 7.3 Modems, Modulation, and How OFDM Moves 6-Bit Numbers Simultaneously to Different People on the Same Carrier
        • 7.3.1 Modulation
        • 7.3.2 Communicating Six Bits: Sending One of 64 QAM Signals
        • 7.3.3 Baud Rate
        • 7.3.4 LTE Specification and OFDMA
      • 7.4 3GPP Releases
        • 7.4.1 The Eventual Pivot To 5G Across the Spectrum
      • 7.5 Summary
    • 8 5G NR: Enhanced Mobile Broadband, IoT Communications
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 3GPP Release 15
        • 8.2.1 Immediate Impact Of 5G: More Bits Per Second
      • 8.3 New Spectrum
        • 8.3.1 Millimeter-wave (mmWave)
      • 8.4 5G Design Goals and Use Cases
        • 8.4.1 Enhanced Mobile Broadband
        • 8.4.2 Massive Machine-type Communication
        • 8.4.3 Ultra-Reliable, Low-Latency Communications
      • 8.5 Summary
    • 9 Wi-Fi: 802.11 Wireless LANs
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 802.11 Components and Operation
      • 9.3 Spectrum and Standards to Wi-Fi 6 802.11ax
      • 9.4 Wi-Fi Security
      • 9.5 Summary
    • 10 Communication Satellites
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Geosynchronous Earth Orbit
      • 10.3 Path Delay
      • 10.4 Low Earth Orbit
      • 10.5 Summary
  • Course 2221 Fundamentals of Voice over IP
    Third is a complete introduction to everything Voice over IP. You'll learn the fundamental ideas and principles of a VoIP telephone system, VoIP, SIP & all the other jargon - what it means and how it all works together.
    We'll explain VoIP phone system components and operation, and how voice communications in packets works end-to-end, microphone to speaker, in plain English.
    We'll sort out SIP, Softswitches & SIP Trunking, VoIP on LANs and WANs, VoIP phones, Softswitch in the Cloud, and a peek at The Future.
    • 1 Course Introduction
      • 1.1 Introduction
    • 2 VoIP Phones
      • 2.1 Computers That Look Like Telephones
      • 2.2 VoIP Phone Functions
      • 2.3 Quality of Service and Differentiated Services
      • 2.4 Computer as the Terminal
      • 2.5 VoIP over Cellular
      • 2.6 Summary
    • 3 Voice in IP Packets
      • 3.1 Introduction
        • 3.1.1 Voice in IP Packets End-to-End
        • 3.1.2 Missing or Delayed Packets
    • 4 SIP and Soft Switches / SIP Servers / Call Managers
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Soft Switch
      • 4.3 Functions of a Soft Switch
        • 4.3.1 Terminal Control
        • 4.3.2 Call Control
      • 4.4 Soft Switch Terminology
    • 5 Media Servers
      • 5.1 Introduction
        • 5.1.1 Integrated Messaging Server
      • 5.2 Video Server
        • 5.2.1 Personal Video Recorder Service
      • 5.3 Other Types of Media Servers
    • 6 Gateways
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Media Conversion
      • 6.3 Signaling Conversion
    • 7 LANs and WANs
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 LANs
        • 7.2.1 Power over Ethernet
        • 7.2.2 Wireless LANs
      • 7.3 WANs
        • 7.3.1 Service Level Agreements
        • 7.3.2 MPLS VPNs and SIP Trunking
    • 8 Key VoIP Standards
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 IETF Standards
      • 8.3 ITU-T Standards
      • 8.4 IEEE LAN Standards
      • 8.5 TIA Cable Standards
    • 9 Broadband IP Dial Tone
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 IP Dial Tone
      • 9.3 The Internet and the Telephone Network Become One
      • 9.4 Value-Added Services
  • Course 2201 The PSTN
    The final telecommunications course in the CTNS package is a history lesson, understanding how and why telephone networks and the companies that provide them are organized into local access and inter-city transmission, or as we will see, Local Exchange Carriers (LECs) and Inter-Exchange Carriers (IXCs), to form the Public Switched Telephone Network.
    The structure, components and operations described in this course were built worldwide, in every country on earth, during the period 1970 - 2000. Though all new builds are Ethernet and IP, knowledge of the structure and jargon of the PSTN is part of the required knowledge in telecom while there remains a large installed base.
    In fact, understanding DS0 channels and circuit-switching is necessary to know how a phone call from a cellphone on a wireless network connects to a phone plugged into a competitor's cable modem in another city.
    • 1 Course Introduction
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Course Outline
      • 1.3 Course Objectives
    • 2 History of Telecommunications (USA and Canada)
      • 2.1 Introduction and Objectives
      • 2.2 Invention of the Telephone
      • 2.3 AT&T
      • 2.4 Consolidation and Competition
      • 2.5 Canadian Telecommunications
      • 2.6 Canadian Telephone Companies
      • 2.7 Summary
    • 3 The Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN)
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Basic Model for the PSTN
      • 3.3 Loops
      • 3.4 Trunks and Circuit-Switching
      • 3.5 Remotes
      • 3.6 DSL
      • 3.7 Summary
    • 4 Analog Circuits and Sound
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Definition of Analog
      • 4.3 Reconstructing Sound at the Far End
      • 4.4 Design Choices
      • 4.5 Sound Pressure Waves
      • 4.6 If a Tree Falls in the Forest, and No-One is There to Hear It, Does it Cause a Sound?
      • 4.7 Summary
    • 5 The Voiceband
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Reproduce Thoughts vs. Reproduce Sound Pressure Waves
      • 5.3 The Voiceband
      • 5.4 Fidelity
      • 5.5 That's A as in "Are"
      • 5.6 Summary
    • 6 Plain Ordinary Telephone Service
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Twisted Pair Loops
      • 6.3 Components of a Telephone
      • 6.4 Supervision
      • 6.5 Lighting Protection
      • 6.6 Summary
    • 7 Pulse Dialing and DTMF
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Pulse Signaling
      • 7.3 Make-Or-Break
      • 7.4 DTMF
      • 7.5 Summary
    • 8 SS7
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Signaling the Called Number
      • 8.3 SCPs, STPs and AIN
      • 8.4 Advanced Call Routing Service
      • 8.5 SIP vs. SS7
  • Course 2212 OSI Layers and Protocol Stacks
    The OSI 7-Layer Reference Model organizes the functions that need to be performed to communicate into logical groups of separable functions called layers, to be able to discuss separate issues separately and not get things jumbled up.
    First, we'll define the term "protocol" and compare that to a standard. Then we'll define "layer" and how a layered architecture operates, and provide an overview of the name, purpose and function of each of the seven layers in the OSI model.
    Then, we'll go back through the story more slowly, with one lesson for each of the layers, examining in greater detail the functions that have to be performed and giving examples of protocols and how and where they are used to implement particular layers.
    The result is a protocol stack, one protocol on top of another on top of another to fulfill all of the required functions.
    To make this more understandable, this course ends with the famous FedEx Analogy illustrating the concepts using company-to-company communications, and an analogy of Babushka dolls to illustrate how the protocol headers are nested at the bits level.
    • 1 Course Introduction
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Objectives
      • 1.3 List of Lessons
    • 2 Open Systems
      • 2.1 Lesson Introduction and Objectives
      • 2.2 Homogeneous vs. Heterogeneous Vendor Environment
      • 2.3 Interoperability via Emulation or Protocol Conversion
      • 2.4 Open Systems
      • 2.5 Summary
    • 3 Protocols and Standards
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Definitions
      • 3.3 Functions to Perform
      • 3.4 Structured Protocols
      • 3.5 Summary
    • 4 ISO OSI 7-Layer Reference Model
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 The OSI Model
      • 4.3 Defining a Network: Layers 1-3
      • 4.4 Transport Service
      • 4.5 Upper Layers
      • 4.6 Down the Protocol Stack
      • 4.7 Summary
    • 5 Physical Layer
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Definition of the Physical Layer
      • 5.3 Examples
      • 5.4 Summary
    • 6 Data Link Layer
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Frames and Their Function
      • 6.3 MAC Frames
      • 6.4 Summary
    • 7 Network Layer
      • 7.1 Introduction and Objectives
      • 7.2 Definition of a Network
      • 7.3 Packet-Switching
      • 7.4 Circuit-Switching
      • 7.5 Summary
    • 8 Transport Layer
      • 8.1 Introduction and Objectives
      • 8.2 Reliability
      • 8.3 Port Numbers
      • 8.4 Transport Service
      • 8.5 Summary
    • 9 Session Layer
      • 9.1 Introduction and Objectives
      • 9.2 Definition of the Session Layer
        • 9.2.1 Client-Server Sessions
        • 9.2.2 Peer-to-Peer Sessions
      • 9.3 Cookies
      • 9.4 Passwords and Authentication Servers
      • 9.5 Summary
    • 10 Presentation Layer
      • 10.1 Introduction and Objectives
      • 10.2 Character Coding: ASCII and Unicode
      • 10.3 MIME Image Coding
      • 10.4 Codecs
      • 10.5 Data Compression
      • 10.6 Encryption
        • 10.6.1 Public Key Encryption
        • 10.6.2 Digital Signature
      • 10.7 Independence and Separability of the Layers
      • 10.8 Summary
    • 11 Application Layer
      • 11.1 Introduction and Objectives
      • 11.2 Definition and Examples
      • 11.3 More Examples
      • 11.4 Summary
    • 12 Protocol Stacks: The FedEx Analogy
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Sending Information in FedEx Packets
      • 12.3 Summary
    • 13 Protocol Headers and Babushka Dolls
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Protocol Stack Operation End-to-End
      • 13.3 Encapsulation
      • 13.4 Summary
    • 14 Standards Organizations
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 ISO Model and IETF RFCs
      • 14.3 Telecom-Related Standards
      • 14.4 Summary
  • Course 2211 LANs, VLANs, Wireless and Optical Ethernet
    As we will have established in the OSI Layers course, Layer 2 is all about communications between two devices that are on the same circuit, or more precisely, in the same broadcast domain.
    We'll begin with the fundamentals: Ethernet and its bus topology, the idea of a broadcast domain, MAC frames and MAC addresses, Layer 2 or Ethernet switches and VLANs.
    We'll cover the IEEE 802 standards from 10BASE-T to 100GBASE-ER4, LAN cables and TIA-568 cable categories and in-building cabling design, plus Wi-Fi wireless LANs.
    This course finishes with a lesson on Optical Ethernet, which implements the point-to-point fiber pipes of the plumbing of an IP network.
    • 1 Course Introduction
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Lesson-by-Lesson Outline
    • 2 Broadcast Domains, MAC Addresses and MAC Frames
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Broadcast Domains
      • 2.3 MAC Addresses and MAC Frames
      • 2.4 Summary
    • 3 LAN Switches a.k.a. Layer 2 Switches
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 MAC Tables and Layer 2 Switching
      • 3.3 Broadcast Frames
      • 3.4 Summary
    • 4 VLANs
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 VLAN Principles
      • 4.3 802.1Q Tag Header for Trunked Connections
      • 4.4 Summary
    • 5 802 Standards: 802.3 Twisted Pair and 802.11 Wi-Fi
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Ethernet and the 802 Series of Standards
      • 5.3 Ethernet on Copper Wires
        • 5.3.1 Baseband System
        • 5.3.2 Power over Ethernet (PoE)
      • 5.4 Wi-Fi: Ethernet over the Ether
        • 5.4.1 MAC Frames on Radio
        • 5.4.2 802.11 Standards
      • 5.5 Summary
    • 6 LAN Cables, Categories, Wiring Plan and Switch Hierarchy
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Fundamentals
      • 6.3 TIA-568 Cable Categories
      • 6.4 Quality and Performance
      • 6.5 What Category to Install
      • 6.6 Wiring Plan and Layer 2 Switch Hierarchy
      • 6.7 Summary
    • 7 Optical Ethernet and Fiber Links
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Fiber, Lasers and Architectures
      • 7.3 Physical Modules and Connectors
      • 7.4 Optical Ethernet Standards
      • 7.5 Summary
  • Course 2213 IP Networks, Routers and Addresses
    A comprehensive course on Layer 3 of the OSI Model: networking, concentrating on IP addresses, routers and packets.
    We begin with the two basic principles of packet networks: bandwidth on demand, also known as overbooking, oversubscription and statistical multiplexing; and packet-switching, also known as packet forwarding or routing.
    We'll understand what routers do and where they are located, routing tables and the basic operation of a router and the standard strategy deploying an edge router between the LANs and the WAN at each location.
    Then we'll cover IP version 4: address classes and how they are assigned to Regional Internet Registries then ISPs then end-users, dotted-decimal notation, static addresses, dynamic addresses and DHCP, public addresses, private addresses and NAT.
    The course concludes with IPv6: the IPv6 packet and changes from IPv4, IPv6 address allocations and assignments and end up understanding how IPv6 subnets will be assigned to broadcast domains and 18 billion billion addresses per residence.
    • 1 Course Introduction
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Lesson-by-Lesson Course Overview
      • 1.3 Learning Objectives
      • 1.4 Technical Background and Introduction
    • 2 Review: Channelized Time-Division Multiplexing (TDM)
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Channelized TDM Fundamentals
      • 2.3 Channelized TDM Drawbacks
      • 2.4 Summary
    • 3 Statistical Time-Division Multiplexing: Bandwidth-on-Demand
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Statistical Multiplexing: Overbooking
      • 3.3 The Need for Addresses
      • 3.4 Summary
    • 4 Private Network: Routing + Bandwidth on Demand
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Routing and Bandwidth on Demand
      • 4.3 Summary
    • 5 Routers and Routing
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Routing Tables, Address Prefix and Mask
        • 5.2.1 Routing Tables
        • 5.2.2 Prefix and Mask
      • 5.3 Packet Filtering, Port Filtering and Firewalls
      • 5.4 Customer Edge (CE)
      • 5.5 Summary
    • 6 IPv4 Addresses
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 IP Addresses and Address Classes
      • 6.3 Writing IP Addresses in Hex and Dotted-Decimal
      • 6.4 Summary
    • 7 DHCP
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Dynamic and Static Addresses
      • 7.3 Discovery, Offer, Acceptance and Ancillary Information
      • 7.4 Assigning Static Addresses with DHCP, Enabling DHCP
      • 7.5 Summary
    • 8 Public and Private IPv4 Addresses
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Public Addresses
      • 8.3 Private Addresses
      • 8.4 Summary
    • 9 Network Address Translation
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Network Address Translator
      • 9.3 Associating Fake Port Numbers with Private Addresses
      • 9.4 Security and Other Advantages of NAT
      • 9.5 Summary
    • 10 IPv6 Overview
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Benefits of IPv6
        • 10.2.1 128-Bit Addresses
        • 10.2.2 Header Simplification
        • 10.2.3 Improved Support for Extensions and Options:
        • 10.2.4 Support for Traffic Management:
      • 10.3 IPv6 Header Fields
      • 10.4 Summary
    • 11 IPv6 Address Allocations and Assignment
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 IPv6 Address Types
      • 11.3 Control of IPv6 Addresses
      • 11.4 Structure of the 128-bit IPv6 Address
      • 11.5 Summary
  • Course 2214 MPLS and Carrier Packet Networks
    The structure, components and operation of carrier packet networks and services, how they are implemented, packaged and marketed, and how they are used by government, business and other carriers.
    The IP packets and routing of the IP course is one part of the story. Performance guarantees, and methods for quality of service, traffic management, aggregation and integration are another big part of the story, particularly once we leave the lab and venture into the real world and the business of telecommunications services.
    We'll begin by establishing a basic model for a customer obtaining service from a provider, defining Customer Edge, Provider Edge, access and core, and a Service Level Agreement: traffic profile vs. Class of Service transmission characteristics.
    Next, we'll understand virtual circuits, a powerful tool used for traffic management, and the key factor we need to control: delay.
    With the fundamentals in place, we'll go through the implementation of virtual circuits with MPLS, explaining MPLS-specific jargon, and all of the functions and services it is used to implement in the network core.
    • 1 Course Introduction
      • 1.1 Technical Background and Introduction
      • 1.2 Lesson-by-Lesson Course Overview
      • 1.3 Learning Objectives
    • 2 Carrier Packet Network Basics
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Recap: Packet-Switching and Bandwidth on Demand
      • 2.3 Carrier Network Core, Edge and Access
      • 2.4 Advantages of Packet Services
      • 2.5 Summary
    • 3 Service Level Agreements: Traffic Profile and Class of Service
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Service Level Agreement (SLA) and Class of Service (CoS)
      • 3.3 Traffic Profiles
      • 3.4 Enforcement: Out of Profile Traffic
      • 3.5 Financial Considerations
      • 3.6 Summary
    • 4 Virtual Circuits
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Virtual Circuits for Traffic Classes
      • 4.3 Packet Classification
      • 4.4 Summary
    • 5 QoS Requirement for Voice Over IP
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Advantages of Transmitting Voice in Packets
      • 5.3 How VoIP Works, The Need to Guarantee Delay and Jitter
      • 5.4 MPLS QoS Mechanism to Implement CoS Guarantee
      • 5.5 Summary
    • 6 MPLS
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 MPLS Labels
      • 6.3 Virtual Circuits: Label-Switched Paths
      • 6.4 MPLS Operation
      • 6.5 Summary
    • 7 TCP/IP over MPLS, and VPLS
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Server to Carrier
      • 7.3 MPLS Label-Switching in the Network, Network to Client
      • 7.4 User-Network Interface
      • 7.5 VPLS
      • 7.6 Summary
    • 8 Differentiated Classes of Service using MPLS
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Implementing Differentiated Services
      • 8.3 Practical Classes of Service
      • 8.4 Summary
    • 9 Integration and Convergence using MPLS
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Four Access Circuits for Four Services
      • 9.3 One Access Circuit and Four Labels for Four Services
      • 9.4 Summary
    • 10 Managing Aggregates of Traffic with MPLS Label Stacking
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Subnets in Each Location
      • 10.3 Labels and Label-Stacking by Customer Premise Equipment
      • 10.4 Labels and Stacking by the Carrier Equipment
      • 10.5 Summary
    • 11 MPLS Services vs. Internet Service
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 What is an "MPLS Service"?
      • 11.3 MPLS Service vs. Internet and/or SD-WAN Service
      • 11.4 Costing
      • 11.5 Connection to MPLS Service
      • 11.6 What Does the Future Hold for MPLS Services?
      • 11.7 Summary

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